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Solar Power Solutions

If you are interested in solar power, there are multiple options available to you. Even if you are a renter, you can still take advantage of solar power without having to make any changes to your residence. Listed below are different options for solar power along with their pros and cons:


If you'd like to receive a Free quote for a solar system, go to Solar-Savings.org and fill out the information. WattDoesItUse is an affiliate of Sunrun who runs the site.

Community Solar

Community solar, also known as community-shared solar, community-owned solar, and solar gardens, are remotely installed and managed solar power. It is a great option for people that rent or don't have the proper setup at their residence to install solar.

Pros

  • No install at your residence
  • Owners and Renters can participate
  • No hassle setup
  • No onsite visits or construction needed at your residence
  • Credit on your utility bill
  • As low as $0 down to start

Cons

  • If you move out of the utility service area, you won’t be able to continue getting credits on your electricity bill
  • Not all deployments allow you to get federal tax incentives
  • May not increase the value of your residence
  • Not available in all markets

Purchase Solar Power System

When you purchase a solar power system, you’ll have the solar panels installed on the roof of your residence. This requires a site evaluation to ensure the proper placement of the solar panels and installation of the panels. Depending on the company you work with, they will include maintenance and a warranty on the panels (and possibly the labor as well).

Pros

  • You own the system
  • You get any federal tax incentives for installing solar power
  • Increase property value of the residence
  • Greater long term savings

Cons

  • As a renter, can’t do this without landlord approval
  • Requires site evaluation, which could lead to additional costs to be in compliant with the install
  • Your residence may not have enough roof space or be shaded, which will limit the amount of electricity generated
  • Larger financial commitment
  • Below is a vendor where you can purchase solar power systems.

Lease Solar Power System

When you lease a solar power system, the installers will go through the same process as if you purchased the system and install it at your residence, but the difference is that you don’t own the system. Instead, you pay a monthly lease payment, which is usually less than your electricity bill for the same amount of power, and the company takes care of the rest. Most solar leasing companies include a buy-out clause so that you can get some of the benefits of the purchased solar power system.

Pros

  • Typically $0 to start
  • You have the chance to buy-out the system later
  • Start saving on your Energy bill day one
  • Lock in low rates per kWh
  • Ongoing maintenance and support

Cons

  • Not all programs allow you to take advantage of federal tax incentive
  • Buy-out is usually 5-8 years after initial install
  • Property value doesn’t increase, unless you buy-out the system
  • Requires site evaluation, which could lead to additional costs to be in compliant with the install
  • Your residence may not have enough roof space or be shaded, which will limit the amount of electricity generated
  • Below is a vendor where you can lease solar power systems.